Two new academic posts in St Andrews Divinity school

We have today advertised two new posts, in Systematic and Historical Theology, and in Theological Ethics. The adverts are here (S&HT) and here (ethics). The posts are permanent, on the Lecturer scale. We’re hopeful of getting some good applicants and two outstanding new colleagues. This really is a great place to live and to work!

Read More

Thinking about social media

I’ve been a bit slow in blogging here, over the past few weeks, but I have been writing things elsewhere, particularly in the area of churches and social media. If you’ve not seen them, and are interested, I have three pieces on the Baptist Times website about this: What is ‘social media’? The future of social media A theology of social media I also did a video interview with the American site Ethics Daily on a similar...

Read More

A truly ‘conservative’ evangelical account of gender and church office

I want here to take issue with the term ‘conservative evangelical’: a ‘conservative evangelical,’ if words retain any meaning, should necessarily be actively committed to promoting the equal ministry of women and men at every level of church office.

Read More

Adaptive theologies for a changing climate

My friend Ruth Valerio has a typically thoughtful and well-written blog post up about the need for adaptive theologies in the face of our changing climate, to which she drew my attention when we were talking about something else. (If you don’t follow Ruth’s blog, you should; she offers intelligent and important comment, and also delicious recipes!) Ruth draws on a distinction now standard in discussions of climate change between ‘mitigation’ and ‘adaptation’. We can, and should, attempt to mitigate the damage done to the environment by radically reducing fossil fuel use, extensively planting trees, or whatever; at the same time, we have to acknowledge that climate change is already irreversible, and so there is a need to¬†adapt...

Read More

A US election, social media, and Christian internationalism

In every country in the world bar one, thoughtful Christian people seem to be remarkably united in publicly expressing pleasure and relief at the re-election of Barack Obama as President of the USA; the single exception is the USA itself, where the reaction is considerably more mixed, and the majority position probably leans towards sadness at the outcome, with a significant minority expressing something like horror. How do we make any sense of that?

Read More
get facebook like button