Why ‘complementarianism’ matters: reflections occasioned by Carl Trueman

Carl Trueman has an excellent blog post on the Reformation21 site, expressing puzzlement at why so many (American, evangelical) parachurch organisations make complementarianism (male-only leadership) a defining point of their platform. He highlights the potential absurdity of this in characteristically sharp and witty fashion, pointing out that the historical divisions that these organisations choose to bridge (baptismal practice; church polity; doctrines of grace) are, or should be, far more basic than complementarianism, and asking some sharp questions about practice (he imagines a situation of a male, paedobaptist, Presbyterian minister and a female Baptist minister visiting a Baptist church that is part of one of these coalitions, and asks how this will be...

Read More

On writing and being read: Jared Wilson on Fifty Shades…

‘When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’ ‘The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’ ‘The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master — that’s all.’ (Lewis Carroll, Alice Through the Looking Glass, ch. 6) A rather ugly storm in the blogosphere has broken out over the last couple of days over a recent post on the Gospel Coalition website. I don’t want to adjudicate who is right and who is wrong (like anyone involved might listen to me…), so much as to reflect on the misunderstanding – and the anger – to understand...

Read More

British and European theological bloggers

A while back I announced a desire to keep a list of British and European theological blogs; several people made helpful suggestions, and I’ve been meaning to construct the list, but, well, life… I have now put all the suggestions I had or received in the blogroll on the right; if you hover a mouse over them, you should get a bit of description. I’ll get it all up on a page soon. Further suggestions very welcome – there must be more theological blogging than this?

Read More

Justice and the gospel: Bruce Longenecker on Paul and the poor.

Joel Willits offers a review of my former colleague Bruce Longenecker’s recent book Remember the Poor: Paul, Poverty, and the Greco-Roman World (Eerdmans) over at Euangelion. I have not yet seen a copy, but Bruce was working in these directions before he left St Andrews for Baylor, and I think I can guess something of how the argument goes: although there is not an enormous amount of emphasis in the NT texts on Paul’s ongoing concern for the collection for the church in Jerusalem, or for caring for economically-disadvantaged members of the community, there is some; if we consider the then-prevalent assumption amongst devout diaspora Jews (like Paul…) that charity was an essential component of acceptable worship, then we can reconstruct on the...

Read More

British/European theo-bloggers

For reasons explained in the previous post, I would like to start to construct a list of British and European blogs with theological content. Nominations are hereby invited. I guess we need to define ‘theological content’. I would go for something like this: ‘a majority of the posts would be interesting to someone, educated to higher degree level, who is generally interested in theology and wants to keep abreast of contemporary developments and discussions.’ So a blog that offers informed and reasoned posts on a particular theological topic, and a blog that serves to alert its readers of upcoming publications, lectures, and conferences, both make the cut. I would generally like to err on the side of generosity, also: it is a list inviting...

Read More
get facebook like button